Running Splits and Negative Splits for Road Racing

As you know, running a race is all about maintaining your pace. Most runners strive to maintain a steady pace throughout a race. Other runners develop strategies for changing their pace during certain parts of their race. In this post, we’ll discuss what a negative split is and how it affects your running performance.

A negative split is when you run your race at a faster pace in the second half of the race. It can be broken down into the first half and second half of the race. Or, it can be further subdivided.

If you divide the race evenly into halves, a simple negative split is to run the second half faster than the first. For example, if you run a marathon in exactly 4 hours, and you reach the half marathon at 2:01, you have successfully run a negative split. That is, the second half of the marathon was run in 1:59.

You can further subdivide your race by miles or kilometers. For example, if you are running a 10 mile race and average the first 8 miles with a 7 minute per mile pace, you can run a negative pace the final two miles. To do so, pick up the pace and strive for 6:45 miles.

Running negative splits is very tough. Most runners who haven’t trained for this usually start the first half of a race too fast for their fitness level. The result is that the second half of the race is slower than the first half. With the right amount of training and pace preparation, you should be able to achieve negative splits in your next race.

Running Speed Calculator

The running pace calculator on this website provides 3 different types of results: your calculated running pace, a running pace chart and your calculated running speed.

Your running pace is how long it takes you to run a completed cycle, typically a single mile or 1 kilometer. Therefore, when your run at a pace, you can say that you are running a specific time per distance. For example, an eight minute mile or 5 minutes per kilometer.

Running speed is a different calculation. It is usually defined at the distance traveled per hour. For example, 10 miles per hour or 6 kilometers per hour.

The difference between your pace and your calculated speed is vastly different. For example, if you run an 6 minute mile pace, it would take you 1 hour to run 10 miles. If you run at 6 miles per hour, your pace would be 10 minutes per mile.

As you can see, running speed and running pace are very different numbers. However, both numbers will provide insight into how fast your are running. They can both provide key points of data to improve your training and your fitness level.

Determine your Running Race Pace Using a Pace Chart

A pace chart is a very important tool for runners who plan on attempting a road race. Whether it is a 5k, 10k, 10 miler or marathon, a pace chart is a key tool in race planning.

There are many aspects to race planning. Aside from the obvious of training, race registration, preparing meals, preparing clothes and more, you must have your target race pace. The target race pace is what your pace goal is for the race.

Most runners strive for even splits during their race. What this means is that you run an even, steady, pace for the entire race. If your race pace is 10 minutes per mile for 5 miles, then the finish time would be 50 minutes. Even splits are something that most runners strive for.

Using a pace chart to determine your race pace is very easy. To begin, find your target race distance on the chart. Let’s assume you plan to run a 10k road race. Next, you need to decide if you want to track your pace in miles or kilometers. If your race is in the United States, chances are the markers will be set a 1 mile intervals. Elsewhere, the markers will be at each kilometer.

Next, refer to your training runs to find a challenging pace for the target distance. You’ll know if the goal is reasonable by looking at the projected finish time on the pace chart.

Use the pace chart on running pace calculator for assistance.

Your Running Pace is Important to Track

For many runners, numbers are all that they think about. Just like most sports, numbers and stats can be taken to the extreme. Here are some of the numbers runners think about.

  • Time of running pace
  • Total time of your run
  • Distance of your run in miles or kilometers
  • Distance of your race
  • What number you place
  • A marathon is about 26 miles or approximately 42 kilometers
  • Number of repetitions or intervals
  • Personal record
  • Personal record at each age division
  • Weight
  • Temperature
  • And, a lot more

With all the numbers to track, why is your running pace important. The answer is that it depends on your goals.

If you are running to prepare for a race, tracking your pace is a key indicator for what you are capable of achieving in the race. That is, you can project your approximate finishing time. Knowing your pace for a certain distance will also help you perform at your best in the race. Trying to run an even pace will be very important to finishing the race.

If you are running for health reasons, such as to lose weight, tracking your running pace is a key measure. The pace you run at the start of your health routine gives you a beginning reference point. From here, after you have run for several weeks or months, an improvement in your pace will tell you that you are making progress towards your health goals.

What Running Pace Should You Run?

The running pace you should run is primarily dictated by your level of fitness, the length of the run and your running capability.

First, your pace cannot be selected arbitrarily. Selecting a pace for a run or a road race should be done with careful consideration. You should never select your running pace based on what you would like to run unless you have completed adequate training. Never select a pace that you have never run before.

So, what should you do. Consult the following pointers, and, your running pace chart to determine your pace.

Level of Fitness
First, your level of running fitness is a key to determing your running pace. For long races, if you have not put in the appropriate amount of mileage, you will not have the staminia to maintain your race pace. For shorter road races, you need to have trained with the right amount of speed. Don’t attempt to race a particular pace until you have run it several times in training. Preferably, you have run this race pace in shorter distances to get a good feel for what the pace feels like. You should be able to maintain the pace in a consistent manner for 75% of the targeted distance of the race.

Length of Run
Naturally, the length of your run will be a determing factor in your pace. The longer the run, the slower the pace. Check your running pace with our calculator then check the pace chart. Use your training as a guide to help you determine what pace you can maintain. If you have a high level of fitness, generally your pace will decrease 10% per kilometer or per mile.

Running Capability
Finally, your running capability will dictate your pace. Faster running can maintain a faster pace. If you can run a mile in 6 minutes, but you can’t run 2 miles in 12 minutes, you shouldn’t target a 6 minute per mile pace in a 10k race. Pick a slower pace.

What is a Running Pace Calculator

A running pace calculator is a tool for calculating a your pace to run or race. But, let’s take a look at what “pace” really is.

There are many meanings of the word pace. The simplest is that a pace is a single step. However, for running marathons, a pace is more than just a step. Another meaning is your manner of stepping, such as your gait. However, this isn’t on trace for use in a running pace calculator.

A closer meaning of pace for running is your rate of movement. Or, more specifically, the measurement of the rate of movement. So, your running pace is the rate, or speed, of your movement over a measured distance.

More simply, pace is how long it takes you to run over a distance. Typically, on runningpacecalculator.com, pace is how fast you run over a measure mile or kilometer in minutes and seconds.

The running pace calculator will take any given run and calculate your consistent pace for a kilometer or miles.