Entries Tagged 'Pace Chart' ↓

Running Speed Calculator

The running pace calculator on this website provides 3 different types of results: your calculated running pace, a running pace chart and your calculated running speed.

Your running pace is how long it takes you to run a completed cycle, typically a single mile or 1 kilometer. Therefore, when your run at a pace, you can say that you are running a specific time per distance. For example, an eight minute mile or 5 minutes per kilometer.

Running speed is a different calculation. It is usually defined at the distance traveled per hour. For example, 10 miles per hour or 6 kilometers per hour.

The difference between your pace and your calculated speed is vastly different. For example, if you run an 6 minute mile pace, it would take you 1 hour to run 10 miles. If you run at 6 miles per hour, your pace would be 10 minutes per mile.

As you can see, running speed and running pace are very different numbers. However, both numbers will provide insight into how fast your are running. They can both provide key points of data to improve your training and your fitness level.

Determine your Running Race Pace Using a Pace Chart

A pace chart is a very important tool for runners who plan on attempting a road race. Whether it is a 5k, 10k, 10 miler or marathon, a pace chart is a key tool in race planning.

There are many aspects to race planning. Aside from the obvious of training, race registration, preparing meals, preparing clothes and more, you must have your target race pace. The target race pace is what your pace goal is for the race.

Most runners strive for even splits during their race. What this means is that you run an even, steady, pace for the entire race. If your race pace is 10 minutes per mile for 5 miles, then the finish time would be 50 minutes. Even splits are something that most runners strive for.

Using a pace chart to determine your race pace is very easy. To begin, find your target race distance on the chart. Let’s assume you plan to run a 10k road race. Next, you need to decide if you want to track your pace in miles or kilometers. If your race is in the United States, chances are the markers will be set a 1 mile intervals. Elsewhere, the markers will be at each kilometer.

Next, refer to your training runs to find a challenging pace for the target distance. You’ll know if the goal is reasonable by looking at the projected finish time on the pace chart.

Use the pace chart on running pace calculator for assistance.

What Running Pace Should You Run?

The running pace you should run is primarily dictated by your level of fitness, the length of the run and your running capability.

First, your pace cannot be selected arbitrarily. Selecting a pace for a run or a road race should be done with careful consideration. You should never select your running pace based on what you would like to run unless you have completed adequate training. Never select a pace that you have never run before.

So, what should you do. Consult the following pointers, and, your running pace chart to determine your pace.

Level of Fitness
First, your level of running fitness is a key to determing your running pace. For long races, if you have not put in the appropriate amount of mileage, you will not have the staminia to maintain your race pace. For shorter road races, you need to have trained with the right amount of speed. Don’t attempt to race a particular pace until you have run it several times in training. Preferably, you have run this race pace in shorter distances to get a good feel for what the pace feels like. You should be able to maintain the pace in a consistent manner for 75% of the targeted distance of the race.

Length of Run
Naturally, the length of your run will be a determing factor in your pace. The longer the run, the slower the pace. Check your running pace with our calculator then check the pace chart. Use your training as a guide to help you determine what pace you can maintain. If you have a high level of fitness, generally your pace will decrease 10% per kilometer or per mile.

Running Capability
Finally, your running capability will dictate your pace. Faster running can maintain a faster pace. If you can run a mile in 6 minutes, but you can’t run 2 miles in 12 minutes, you shouldn’t target a 6 minute per mile pace in a 10k race. Pick a slower pace.

How to Maintain Your Running Pace

One of the most common questions that beginner runners have is how to maintain their running pace. Whether for a road race or a run out the door, maintaining your pace can be difficult.

There are several techniques that help a runner to maintain their running pace. Knowing these can help you improve your running, get more joy out of your running and provide incentive to improve.

Training Runs to Pace

It is hard for runners to gauge their pace when they are just beginning to run. It is also difficult for runners who are moving through different phases of running, such as getting faster or slower, to know or maintain their pace. So, the best thing to do is train for your pace.

To do so, schedule a series of runs over a measured distance and mark out the miles or kilometers. Then, run your course as steady as possible and check your watch at each mile or kilometer marker. After 3-6 days of running this route, you should get a good feel for a pace on this course.

Set Attainable Goals

One of the hardest things for a runner is to be realistic about their skills. If you want to train at a certain pace, you need to know whether or not your body is capable of running the pace. Do a time trial, or run on the track to check your fitness. Then, set your running pace goal accordingly.

If you find it difficult to maintain your targeted running pace, slow down early in your run. This will give you staminia for later that will help you to maintain your pace. (Plus, you’ll have a better chance at avoiding injury.)

Don’t forget to check your running pace charts for the distance you want to cover. As you add more distance, adjust your pace downward accordingly.

Maintaining your running pace is simply a matter of practice. You can train your body to keep a steady pace with patience, dedication and determination.